Half and half.

Nearly last in the current series about starter boats where i go all sensible and try to find an actual basic and inexpensive starter boat.

In an earlier post in the series i talked about the idea of finding boats at certain budget points and in the first exercise set a generous budget of £5000 on the water, insured, surveyed and moored.  This time i am halving the budget to £2500 although i am given to be a bit generous on the extras so if we find a boat just about that we might go with it and scratch up the cost of the bits and pieces.  It was great to see Stephen Mundane’s offer in the thousand pound budget challenge and i do think that boat is a genuine micro-cruiser.

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So what are we waiting for ? lets go and see a bloke about a dog.

I have found a couple of boats around the £1000 mark that are just about sail-able although not particularly complete on kit, one otherwise decent looking boat didn’t have an engine and although that might not be a problem for an experienced (and patient) sailor the average beginner might struggle a bit to get back on his mooring without one.  Sailing without an engine for a season is i think one of the best things that a sailor can do if he really wants to understand sailing, tides and seamanship.  Take a look if you will what Tony Smith gets up to with his ‘Shoal Waters’ formerly the late Charles Stock’s boat.

http://creeksailor.blogspot.co.uk/2011/07/creeksailor-book.html

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While we are here lets take a quick look at one i found.  This is stretching the rules a bit as i have no idea what gear comes with the boat, it definitely doesn’t have an engine and neither are sails mentioned so it might be as described a project boat for somebody.

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Today’s rule then is to find a starter boat , ready to sail with as much kit as possible and on the water for £2500.  That is definitely feasible as i know several boat owners who have done that.  What i am going to try and find today is a good sailer first, with 2 useable bunks, a motor, a basic galley and at least some useful kit and as few ‘project’ problems as possible.   It might not be particularly clean and tidy and need some TLC but often a bucket, sponge, scrubbing brush and application of water, detergent and elbow grease is all that is needed……and last time i looked elbow grease was still free !

When i thought about today’s exercise i definitely had one of these in mind as they are neat little boats that sail well although they are very small inside.  One of my friends here lived aboard his Corribee when he was in a ‘bones of arse’ situation and says he got by ok.  For those that know their famous sailors Ellen Macarthur did her round-uk trip in a very basic one that she refitted and Roger Taylor’s rebuilt one has done a transatlantic and been to the arctic several times.  So here is the first of today’s boats , the Corribee at 21 feet.

This is a bilge keel mark 2 and the first actual boat to look at today : https://www.apolloduck.com/boat.phtml?id=539980   Asking price is £1195 with some decent sails and an old-ish outboard.

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This one is well within the budget , has recent sails which look fresh even in the photographs, an older engine which might or might not be in good order and some useful kit.  Sailing, anchoring and mooring gear isn’t mentioned but i would be very surprised if there wasn’t an anchor, some lines and some fenders.  It does look as though it would benefit from a good clean up. maybe buff and polish the topsides and rub down/antifoul the hull.  That would be about 3 long days work for me but unless there are any major problems i could imagine just throwing my seabag aboard and taking it out for a spin.   The downside with the boat if any is that the cabin is very low and i am over 6 foot, i think i could just about sit upright which is crucial for me although when i was last aboard one of these i could stretch out full length on either bunk and there was a useable cooker.  What else do we need ?

Different boat but here is what you get.

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I did a basic search this morning just using one commercial website (Apolloduck) and the Corribee owners website.  Just between those 2 sites i found 8 Corribee’s ranging from mark 1 to mark 3 and both bilge keel and fin keel versions.  Asking price went from below a thousand to just under £3000.  Previously i have seen one complete with trailer at exactly our budget.      This one looked very tidy.

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I don’t want to leave it today with just one boat and thereby suggest that the starter boat challenge is complete and that we can sail off into the sunset with no further problems , rather that is merely a good starting position and from there i wanted to try and find something that i would prefer. I have always liked these little boats, a work colleague had one and she speaks very highly of the type.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Trailer-sailing-boat-Yacht-with-boat-trailer-Jaguar-21/132497186110?hash=item1ed9729d3e:g:8W4AAOSwIk9aX74k

This is s Jaguar 21 , lifting keel trailer-sailer so it almost exactly fulfills my requirements of being within budget, sails well, will dry out and that i can sit inside under cover.

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This one definitely speaks to me a lot more, although i like the Corribee i think that Yacht design has moved on since that time and the Jaguar is much more akin to the IOR hulled boats that i know so well.  The ability to dry out level is exactly what i have with the Liberty and i supsect that the Jaguar has better sailing performance than the Corribee. This one obviously is on Ebay and going to be subject to auction so it might go over our budget but once again i have seen these little boats come up within our budget.

This one is on ebay right now, i suspect that it might go over our budget but you never know, if this was local i would go and see it.  https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Sailing-Yacht-Waarschip-725/232658007713?hash=item362b7f76a1:g:UZMAAOSwQiFaeZym

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That’s it for today folks.

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